Soundcard-Test DOS startup files

awe32

This is an example autoexec.bat that I use to test various soundcards. Each menu loads it’s drivers for the corresponding soundcard.
Note that the names like :AWE32 must have an existing menu entry in config.sys, in this case [AWE32].

I also use common drivers like ctmouse (low mem mouse driver) and shsucdx (low mem cdrom driver) and a lowmem doskey driver.


@echo off
SET DIRCMD=/p /o:gne
SET TEMP=C:\DOS
SET PATH=C:\DOS;C:\drivers;C:\packer;
SET CTCM=c:\dos
PROMPT $p$g
GoTo %config%
:AWE32
SET SOUND=C:\SB16
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 H5 P330 E620 T6
SET MIDI=SYNTH:1 MAP:E MODE:0
C:\SB16\DIAGNOSE /S
C:\SB16\AWEUTIL /S
C:\SB16\SB16SET /P /Q
c:\dos\shsucdx.com /D:optical
LH c:\dos\DOSKEY.COM
LH c:\dos\CTMOUSE.EXE /R2
echo on
GoTo end
:CTCM
SET SOUND=C:\SB16
SET BLASTER=A220 I5 D1 H5 P330 E620 T6
SET MIDI=SYNTH:1 MAP:E MODE:0
c:\dos\shsucdx.com /D:optical
c:\dos\CTCU /S
LH c:\dos\DOSKEY.COM
LH c:\dos\CTMOUSE.EXE /R2
GoTo end
:NOS
:HIMEM
:NOMEM
LH c:\dos\DOSKEY.COM
LH c:\dos\CTMOUSE.EXE /R2
GoTo end
:end
@echo on

And the corresponding config.sys

[COMMON]
rem DEVICE=C:\SB16\DRV\CTMMSYS.SYS
FILES=40
DOS=HIGH,UMB
BUFFERS=30
LASTDRIVE=H
[menu]
menuitem=NOS, No Soundcard + Mouse, EMM386
menuitem=AWE32, Awe32 + Mouse + CD-ROM, EMM386
menuitem=CTCM, CTCM + Mouse + CD-ROM, EMM386
menuitem=HIMEM, HIMEM only
menuitem=NOMEM, No Mem at all
menucolor=10,1
menudefault=NOS,2
[NOS]
DEVICE=c:\dos\HIMEM.SYS /TESTMEM:OFF
DEVICE=c:\dos\EMM386.EXE RAM
[AWE32]
DEVICE=c:\dos\HIMEM.SYS /TESTMEM:OFF
DEVICE=c:\dos\EMM386.EXE RAM
DEVICE=C:\SB16\DRV\CTSB16.SYS /UNIT=0 /BLASTER=A:220 I:5 D:1 H:5
DEVICEHIGH=c:\dos\VIDECDD.SYS /D:OPTICAL
[CTCM]
DEVICE=c:\dos\HIMEM.SYS /TESTMEM:OFF
DEVICE=c:\dos\EMM386.EXE RAM
DEVICEHIGH=c:\dos\VIDECDD.SYS /D:OPTICAL
DEVICE=c:\DOS\CTCM.EXE
[HIMEM]
DEVICE=c:\dos\HIMEM.SYS /TESTMEM:OFF
[NOMEM]

Microsoft Proofing Tools Kit compilation 2016 – Unattented install with only selected languages

Office2016

So this might be the first and only list on the whole web…. The 2016 version of the proofing tools kit will install every language it includes, if you don’t specifically disable it in the config.xml if you want to install it silently.

The problem is, that the example config.xml doesn’t include any language, so you have to add them manually. The language IDs in the Microsoft world are a 4-digit number e.g 1033 for american english. How to get a list then of all the languages? By manually looking into the xml files of each language in the subfolders of the proofkit.ww folder! The proofkit.ww folder includes all the available languages. The first beeing afrikaans is in the folder proof.af. In it, you find it’s proof.xml file, and if you analyse it, you will find IDs with the language ID in it, in this case ProductLanguage=”1078″.

So I analysed all the proof.xml files and added an optionstate line for each language. Now to DISABLE a language file, the state has to be “absent”, if you want to INSTALL a language, the state has to be “local”, as seen in my configuration file. If you dig a bit in it, you will see that I installed English (US), German, French and Luxembourgish. The following code is a complete example with all the language available in the 2016 version, with the 4 languages installed that I mentioned.

For an unattended or silent install, make sure the “Display level” line is configured as I did. Each line that is between those XML quotes <!– … –> is a commentary only and ignored. To avoid an automatic reboot at the end of the installation, set the SETUP_REBOOT to never. Save the code into a file called config.xml and put it into the proofkit.ww folder. The advantage is, that if you run setup.exe manually, and then choose personnalize, you will see that only your defined languages are selected to be installed; therefore you can check if didn’t miss any lanuage in your config.xml.

The command to use in SCCM or any unattended batch file: “setup.exe” /config \fileserver\Office2016proofing\proofkit.ww\config.xml to be started in the \fileserver\Office2016proofing folder, or whereever you stored the data. Config.xml with all languages defined as either to be installed or not be installed:

`
<Configuration Product=”Proofkit”>

<Display Level=”none” CompletionNotice=”no” SuppressModal=”yes” AcceptEula=”yes” />

<!– <Logging Type=”standard” Path=”%temp%” Template=”Microsoft Office Proofkit Setup(*).txt” /> –>
<!– <USERNAME Value=”Customer” /> –>

<COMPANYNAME Value=”ACME” />

<INSTALLLOCATION Value=”%programfiles%\Microsoft Office” />
<!– <LIS CACHEACTION=”CacheOnly” /> –>
<!– <LIS SOURCELIST=”\\server1\share\Office;\\server2\share\Office” /> –>
<!– <DistributionPoint Location=”\\server\share\Office” /> –>
<!– <OptionState Id=”OptionID” State=”absent” Children=”force” /> –>
<Setting Id=”SETUP_REBOOT” Value=”Never” />
<!– <Command Path=”%windir%\system32\msiexec.exe” Args=”/i \\server\share\my.msi” QuietArg=”/q” ChainPosition=”after” Execute=”install” /> –>

<OptionState Id=”IMEMain_1028″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”IMEMain_1041″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”IMEMain_1042″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”IMEMain_2052″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1025″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1026″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1027″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1028″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1029″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1030″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1031″ State=”local” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1032″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1033″ State=”local” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1035″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1036″ State=”local” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1037″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1038″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1039″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1040″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1041″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1042″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1043″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1044″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1045″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1046″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1047″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1048″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1049″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1050″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1051″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1052″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1053″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1054″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1055″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1056″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1057″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1058″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1060″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1061″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1062″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1063″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1065″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1066″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1067″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1068″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1069″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1071″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1074″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1076″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1077″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1078″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1079″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1081″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1082″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1086″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1087″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1088″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1089″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1091″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1092″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1093″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1094″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1095″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1096″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1097″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1098″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1099″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1100″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1101″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1102″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1106″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1110″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1111″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1115″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1121″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1123″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1128″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1130″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1132″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1134″ State=”local” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1136″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1153″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1159″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1160″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_1169″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_2052″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_2068″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_2070″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_2074″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_2108″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_2117″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_3076″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_3082″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_3098″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>
<OptionState Id=”ProofingTools_5146″ State=”absent” Children=”force”/>

</Configuration>
`

Preise auf ebay richtig nachschlagen

“Was ist das Teil wert ?”

Die Frage nach einem Preis für ein Konsolenspiel, Konsole oder was auch immer wird gefühlt alle 2 Minuten in einer Gruppe oder Forum gestellt.

Dabei ist es relativ einfach sich ein Bild über die Preissituation zu machen.

Bevor die Erklärung kommt, wie man ein relativ bekanntes oft zu findendes Spiel nachschlägt, ein paar weitere Ratschläge wann diese Methode nicht immer die beste ist:

  • Richtig rare Spiele die nur sehr selten auf ebay verkauft werden
  • Spiele die grade gehyped werden und dadurch temporär im Preis enorm gestiegen sind (siehe ausverkaufte Amiibos, Nes classic Konsolen, Collector’s Editionen,…)
  • Spiele die wenig bis gar nicht in Deutschland verkauft wurden, aber öfters im Ausland. Für Dragon Ball Spiele wäre z.b das französische Ebay zu empfehlen, da die Spiele dort deutlich billiger weggehen wie in Deutschland

Wir nehmen als Beispiel hier Super Mario World für das Super Nintendo.

Es fängt schon bei der richtigen Suche bei ebay an! Man muss einige einfache Filter kennen:

  • Setze ich Wörter, getrennt durch ein Komma, in Klammern, so heißt das “eins dieser Wörter soll in den gesuchten Artikeln auftauchen”.
  • ein “Minus-Zeichen” heißt: diese Wörter ausschließen! (Hier ist Achtung geboten)
mit Filtern suchen
mit Filtern suchen

 

Schlagwörter im Suchfeld

Wir tippen also ein: “super mario world” Da wir wissen, dass die Angebote oft nintendo oder snes enthalten, tippe ich beides in Klammern. So finde ich Resultate die sowohl nintendo oder snes enthalten. Man könnten auch noch “super nintendo” hinschreiben, aber das Wort “Nintendo” nutzen wir ja schon. Ich weiß auch, dass es das Spiel für Game Boy Advance gibt, oft als “gba” im Titel zu finden oder mit dem Zusatz. Groß / Kleinschreibung spielt übrigens keine Rolle.

erste Resultate

Die ersten Resulate zeigen uns nicht wirklich etwas Interessantes.

Was fällt auf?

  • Wir finden Super Mario für Wii U (wird gefunden da alle 4 Keywords vorhanden sind: super mario world nintendo)
  • 2 Super Mario World Spiele als Sofort-Kauf etc.

Was wir haben wollen ist allerdings ein Preis über vergangene und vor allem VERKAUFTE Artikel. Jeder kann ein Spiel für 50eur reinstellen, aber ist es dann 50eur Wert? Natürlich nicht. Wert ist es im Prinzip, was Leute dafür ausgeben. Natürlich ist ebay Deutschland nicht die ganze Welt, aber sehr sehr groß und repräsentativ genug um es als gute Basis zu nehmen.

Wir filtern die Artikel jetzt auf VERKAUFTE Artikel! Und nur Auktionen.

Man könnte fragen:

Warum denn? Du sagst doch eben, der Wert ist, was Leute ausgeben und auch Sofort-Käufe sind Artikel die die Leute für genau den Preis haben wollen.

Jein: oft wollen diese Leute nicht abwarten bis sie eine Auktion gewinnen, haben also wenig Geduld oder sie haben einfach wenig Ahnung oder trauen sich nicht zu bieten (Zitat von so einigen!). Oder denken “der Preis scheint ok, für das eine Mal nehm ichs, auf nen Euro kommt’s nicht an”. Oder oder oder. Sammler bieten auf Artikel zu ihrem recherchierten Preis; werden sie überboten, wird’s halt eine andere Auktion. Es gibt genügend Argumente, man könnte ein ganzes Buch schreiben.

erste Resulte analysieren und weiter filtern

Wir haben also jetzt die verkauften Artikel gefiltert (2) und merken allerdings dass das Wii U Spiel auftaucht und Merchandising.
Wir müssen spätestens jetzt noch die Kategorie verfeinern, Punkt (3) “PC-Spiele & Videospiele” um das Merch wegzufiltern, und wir wollen nichts mit der Wii zu tun haben also setzen wir noch ” -Wii” in die Suchangabe.

 

nur Auktionen durchsuchen um vorschnelle Händlerkäufe auszufiltern

Mit der Schaltfläche “Auktion” filtern fir noch die stupiden Sofortkäufe weg, von 20eur+

eventuell noch weiter ausfiltern

Was bleibt ? 2 Module sehen wir allein im Screenshot schon : 11,59eur und 19,50eur. All diese Preise schauen wir uns an und ziehen ein Mittelmaß. Und werden ziemlich wahrscheinlich immer unter den Sofort-Käufen sein, die wir ohne gefilterte Suche finden.

Wo kommen die Preisunterschiede her ?

Es gibt viele Gründe:

  • Versionen: hier z.b die mit schwarzem Rand und die mit gelben Rand. Dies können Versionen aus verschiedenen Ländern sein (UKV vs. NOE/EUR, aka England vs. Deutschland), spätere Releases, re-releases wie die Selects, Platinum edition etc.
  • Zeitpunkt der Auktion: Samstags gegen 18h00 sind verdammt viel mehr Leute auf ebay unterwegs wie Dienstags morgens um 9h00.
  • Ist gerade Hype ? Wurde in den News, Artikeln, grossen Youtube Kanälen etc. gerade über das Game gesprochen?
  • Wurde es von einem Freund auf sagen wir 19,50 gepusht weil der Verkäufer nicht weniger wollte? Einige zahlen dann lieber die 10% Gebühren und stellen es Wochen später noch einmal rein, um auf einen höheren Preis zu hoffen.

How to connect an Atari 2600 to a TV using the RF / Antenna cable

Many people have problem finding the correct channel for an old Atari2600, here’s a tutorial how to find the channel manually.

Useful information first:

The Atari 2600 VCS needs at least 6v dc. You can use more to be sure, let’s say 7-9v DC. The internal regulator reduces the input voltage to the needed voltage,but you shouldn’t go to far away from the original 6v.

The polarity is important:

center = “+”
outside = “-”

The power should be about 500mA, but even 300mA should work. My original power adapter is not powerful enough (anymore!?) and I’m using a generic multi-power supply instead.

Generic power supply

TV configuration if you use the antenna/RF connector of the Atari 2600VCS

  1. On my old CRT, I open the menu to configure the current channel
  2. I chose “manual programming”
  3. Western EU (or whatever region you are)
  4. 61Mhz ! (channel 3 is 61.25Mhz. Channel 2 should be around 55.25 Mhz)
  5. Finetune around the 61Mhz until you get the best picture quality !
TV antenna menu
TV antenna menu

TV fine tuning at 61Mhz

Install or deploy any Java 8 with autoupdate off using MSI silent installer

java-oracle

Java is a pain in the *%% and so is the fact that Oracle only provides .EXE installers for Windows anymore.

So first, we need to get the .MSI file …

Step 1:

get the most recent .exe offline installer from the Oracle page by accepting the license agreement of the most recent version:

http://www.oracle.com/technetwork/java/javase/downloads/jre8-downloads-2133155.html

Step 2:

Extract the .MSI. You get the .MSI by starting the setup of the just downloaded file. The Oracle installer will put the .MSI in the following directory:

"C:\users\<your user>\Appdata\LocalLow\Oracle\Java\jre1.8.0_<build>"

where <build> is of course the number of the just downloaded java update.

Here you’ll find the msi file. Notice: The FOLDER is named after the architecture, not the file. Keep that in mind when copying the x86 and x64 to a same common folder.

 

Step 3:

Now that we have the .MSI, we can install Java using a commandline and directly setting some parameters like no update check, no autoupdate, web start etc. I use a commandline that works silently too (for deployments using SCCM for example) that doesn’t restart the machine afterwards. Don’t be confused when you see a progress bar when launching the command line manually.

Command line for version 8u74

msiexec /i jre1.8.0_74.msi /passive /norestart JU=0 JAVAUPDATE=0 AUTOUPDATECHECK=0 RebootYesNo=No WEB_JAVA=1

 

After the install you can check the registry to see that the updates are disabled at:

HKLM\Software\Javasoft\Java Runtime Environment\1.8.0_74\MSI

the keys AUTOUPDATE, JAVAUPDATE and JU are set to 0. Hooray!

 

Gameboy Games Battery replacement how2

Some Gameboy games came out with a save-game function, but at the time the save-games were often not written into a RAM chip, which saved the file forever, but into a chip that needs a battery to keep the data alive. If the battery is empty, the saves are gone.

Many games will still work when the battery is dead, even allow you to save the game, but the next time you turn it on, the save-game is gone.

In this tutorial, I’ll show you how to quickly change the battery.

You need some stuff:

– a soldering iron. Anyone will do it, this is the easiest soldering operation ever
– a 3.8mm gamebit to open the games. Get those from ebay for some bucks only
– a replacement battery CR2032 3volt or a CR 2025. The the 32 is a tiny bit thicker, but fits very well and lasts longer than the 25
– 15mins of time

First of all: there are batteries with soldering tails, and without. If you can get those with tails, get them, else you need some isolating tape too, to fix the battery.

Step 1

First open the game using the gamebit. Take the game apart. The standard classic gameboy games slide open for about 2mm, then you can remove the cover. The gameboy color games open a bit easier.
IMG_20151228_193538

Remove the board, just to make sure you don’t accidentally touch the plastic parts with the soldering iron…you never know..

Step 2

Desolder the old battery. Just heat up the soldering iron and heat up one of the two soldering spots. On all the games I have took apart, the minus and plus inputs were marked on the board.

Desolder the inputs
Desolder the inputs

Step 3

Place the new battery on the board and solder one terminal first. Really make sure that you solder “-” to “-” and “+” to “+”. Make double sure you put it right 😉 If you have got batteries without soldering tails, you can remove the soldering tails from the old battery an solder the tail first, place a strip of tape below it to wrap the new battery into tape to hold it in place. Less professional, but works.

Battery with soldering tails
Battery with soldering tails

Step 4

Put everything back together and test it out 🙂 Have fun

Mein Mega Man 2 NES Casemod

Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo

Es ist schon Jahre her, dass ich ein Mega Man Casemod aus einem meiner NES-Konsolen machen wollte. Ein paar Monate später hab ich dann ein Mega Man Mod von Platinumfunghi gesehen und dachte mir, dass da wohl einer meine Gedanken lesen konnte 🙂 Herauskam ein sehr sauberer professioneller Mod 🙂
Ich wollte also diese eine Aufgabe von meiner virtuellen To-Do-Liste streichen und hab angefangen ein ähnlichen Mod zu planen. Ich schwankte zwischen einem “Stage-Select” Mod und einem springen blue Bomber. Am meisten reizte mich natürlich dann der Boss-Mod und ich hatte schon ein paar Ideen wie ich diesen verwirklichen konnte. Als ersten NES Casemod musste ausserdem Mega Man in Frage kommen, da es mein Lieblingsspiel auf der NES seit meiner Kindheit ist.

Ah ja: Ich hab kürzlich eine US NTSC Konsole bekommen, und hab dieses Board genommen für den Mod,und es noch regionfree gemodded, sodass ich auch meine PAL Spiele auf 60Hz spielen kann (klappt nicht für jedes Spiel,einige sind zu schnell 😉 )

Genug blabla, lass uns anfangen!

1) Die Spender-Konsole demontieren

Die Spenderkonsole hab ich in einem Konsolen-Paket bekommen. Sie ist vergilbt,wurde mit Shopstickern verschönert und sah aus als ob sie in einem Bunker lag…

1_web
Spender NES

Wir müssen die Kiste komplett auseinander schrauben, da quasi jedes Teil anders lackiert wird. Die Schrauben sollten in einer kleinen Box aufgehoben werden, um sie nicht zu verlieren.

3_web
Schrauben..

4_web
Unten

Zur Veranschaulichung zeig ich auch das Interieur. Die Schrauben sind gängige Kreuzschrauben die mit einem üblichen Philips-Schraubendreher entfernt werden. Das Cover kann abgenommen werden um an zusätzliche Schrauben zu gelangen.

Interior
Interieur

Interior
Interieur

Wir entnehmen auch die Schalter für Strom und Reset da diese auch lackiert werden und zusätzlich wird noch die rote LED durch eine blaue ersetzt, passend zum MM-Design.

Loose connectors
Lose Anschlüsse
Switchboard to be removed
Schalter

Die Knöpfe müssen entfernt werden; sie können einfach mit etwas Kraft abgezogen werden.

Remove the buttons
Knöpfe abziehn

Die Kontrolleranschlüsse hängen rum und können einfach entfernt werden.

Controller connectors
Kontrolleranschlüsse

Die oberen schwarzen Teile können durch raus drehen zweier Schrauben entfernt werden. Die 3te Schraube hält die Frontklappe fest.

Screws holding top black parts
Schrauben für die schwarzen Teile

Closeup,3 different fonts
3 verschiedene Schriftarten
P/R buttons
P/R Buttons
"Black" Parts ;)
“Schwarze” Teile 😉

Da wir jetzt alles auseinandergenommen haben, ist es an der Zeit die NES “Multilanguage” zu machen. Wir schneiden daher den 4ten Pin vom CIC durch. So kann man PAL (A und B) und NTSC Spiele spielen. NTSC Spiele laufen im Prinzip schneller als PAL Spiele, weil die NTSC-Konsole eine CPU hat die ein 60Hz Signal ausgibt und daher mehr Bilder pro Sekunde ausgibt als eine 50Hz PAL-Konsole.

Unmodifizierter CIC, das 4te Bein muss weg.
Not yet modified CIC.
Der 4te Pin muss weg.

2) Cover-Vorbereitung

Für das obere Cover gibt es einige Lösungen. Ich wollte zuerst die Bossköpfe auf Decalpaper drucken und dieses über eine Acrylscheibe legen. Viel einfacher ist es allerdings, auf normales Papier zu drucken und mit einem Laminiergerät das Papier haltbar zu machen. Zusammen mit dem Acryl- oder Plexiglas erhält man ein stabiles gut aussehendes Fenster.

Die Bossgrafik an sich kann man leicht mit einem Emulator erstellen. Dazu muss man im MM2 Stageselect einen Screenshot erstellen. Dieser wird natürlich klein sein, mit der Original-NES-Auflösung. Wir müssen den Screenshot zurecht schneiden und hoch skalieren. In einem Programm wie Gimp oder Photoshop muss man “neirest Neighbor” als Algorithmus auswählen und nicht bicubic Resizer etc. da man sonst keine Pixel mehr hat, sondern ein verwaschenes Bild. (die Standard Resizer sind schön für Photos, aber wir wollen ja die Pixel erzwingen).

Schnippschnapp
Echtes Schneiden!
Finished background
Fertiger Hintergrund

Auf geht’s an’s Fenster schneiden !

3) Lasern des Fensters

Das Ausschneiden des Fenster ist eine schwierige und kritische Aufgabe. Man könnte einen Dremel oder Stichsäge benutzen, was allerdings in unschönen Ecken resultieren würde. Ich habe mich dazu entschieden die Fenster per Laser zu schneiden. Da ich keinen besitze, hab ich mich entschieden einen im Fablab in Luxemburg (in Esch-Belval) zu leihen. Dort kann man für einen moderaten Betrag Geräte leihen und auf die Stunde zahlen und ich habe sogar Hilfe von Rodolfo bekommen, der genau weiß wie man mit dem großen Gerät umgeht.

Man sollte wissen, dass das Plastik recht schnell schmilzt und ungeheuer stinkt, daher muss der Raum richtig gut belüftet sein!

Erste Schritte
Erste Schritte
Lazerz !
Lazerz !
20c_web
Moar Lazerz !
zur Hälfte durch
zur Hälfte durch
Ein Teil kann nicht runterfallen ...
Ein Teil kann nicht runterfallen …
... da es von innen gehalten wird
… da es von innen gehalten wird
Diagonale Ansicht
Diagonale Ansicht

Das letzte Stück wird per Dremel weggeflext (also available at the fablabs. Schaut euch mal auf dieser Seite an, ob ein Fablab bei euch in der Gegend ist, wenn ihr keine Werkzeuge bei Hand habt: Fablab-Liste Deutschland
Mit Schleifpapier säubern wir die Kanten.

Schleifer
Schleifer

Sandpapier
Sandpapier

4) Sprayjobs

Ich nutze für diese Konsole die gleichen wasserbasierten Farben wie ich auch für meine andern Konsolen nutze, da ich die glänzenden Farben und Mods nicht mag. Ich nutze 2 Mega-Man-blaue Farben und eine weissliche Farbe für den Dekostreifen.

Ich fang mit einer Grundierung an (Grundierfarbe eignet sich hierfür, am besten die gleiche Marke nehmen, dann habt ihr auch keine Probleme. Einige Grundierfarben vertragen sich nicht mit den Deckfarben.). Das Ganze dann 15mins trocknen lassen. Man sollte etwas Zeit mitbringen und nicht auf die Schnelle lackieren.

3 Farben für diesen Mod
3 Farben für diesen Mod

Grundiert
Grundiert

25_web
White stripes 😉
26_web
Die schwarzen Teile wurden auch weiss lackiert

Ich habe zuerst den weissen Streifen lackiert, und dann mit Malerkrepp den Streifen geschützt (Frogtape geht natürlich auch). Blau wurde in 3 Schichten aufgetragen.

Unterer Teil in hellblau
Unterer Teil in hellblau
Cover getaped in einem Mittelblau
Cover getaped in einem Mittelblau
Cover getaped in einem Mittelblau
Cover getaped in einem Mittelblau

5) Ersetzen der LED durch eine blaue

Während das Gehäuse trocknet (sogar über Nacht) hab ich die kleine Platine mit der LED untersucht. Sie scheint relativ einfach zu wechseln zu sein.

Die Nintendo LED ist eine einfache rote LED, die einmal um 90° geknickt wurde.

LED closeup
LED closeup
LED closeup
LED closeup
Von oben
Von oben

Sie kann recht einfach entlötet werden: erhitzen und mit einer Entlötpumpe das flüssige Lötzinn abziehen.

Entlötpumpe
Entlötpumpe

Die neue LED wird mit der Zange vorsichtig geknickt.

Entfernen der LED
Entfernen der LED

Die neue LED braucht etwas mehr Spannung, wird also nicht ganz so hell leuchten.

Grösse der Original-LED
Grösse der Original-LED

Etwas biegen, nicht die vollen 90°.

Biegen der neuen LED
Biegen der neuen LED

Darauf achten, dass man die LED richtig rum einsetzt! Sie funktioniert nur in eine Richtung (ist halt ne Diode…) Man kann die beiden LEDs vergleichen um die Pole zu ermitteln (innen ist immer ein Teil grösser als der andere) 😉

Vorinstalliert...
Vorinstalliert…

Frisch gelötet, Zeit für einen Test. Die ganze Operation dauert kaum 10 Minuten.

... und gelötet !
… und gelötet !

6) Decals !

Eine lackierte Konsole sieht nur gut aus, wenn man auch wieder Beschriftungen draufpappt. Ich habe ein paar opensource Schriftarten heruntergeladen die den Nintendoschriften sehr ähneln und sie auf Decal-Papier gedruckt…
Ich habe gleich ein paar Duplikate gedruckt, da sie beim Anbringen leicht zerstört werden können !

Printouts
Printouts

Das Decalpapier muss mit 2 Schichten Klarlack wasserdicht gesprüht werden. Jede Schicht sehr gut trocknen lassen! Dann erst kann man sie bedenkenlos in’s Wasser tun.

Ungefähr 40s einweichen lassen
Ungefähr 40s einweichen lassen

Ich nutze kleine metallene Werkzeuge um die Decals zu verschieben, da diese sehr leicht an einem Finger kleben können.

Hilfreiche Geräte
Hilfreiche Geräte

Und so sieht ein erster Fehlversuch aus… zum Glück hab ich an Duplikate gedacht !

First try..bad luck...
First try..bad luck…

45_web

Ich nutze Küchenpapier um das Wasser unter den Decals abzusaugen. Man muss sehr gut aufpassen, da ein zu schnelles Aufsaugen das Decal verschieben kann.

Aufpassen beim Aufsaugen
Aufpassen beim Aufsaugen

Erstes Zusammensetzen,schaut gut aus 🙂

Zusammenbau
Zusammenbau
Schaut ok aus
Schaut ok aus

Am Schluss hab ich das ganze mit mattem Klarlack überzogen, um die Decals zu schützen. Ausserdem hab ich den grünen DMG noch fertiggestellt 😉

Letzte Lackschichten
Letzte Lackschichten
Letzte Lackschichten
Letzte Lackschichten
Letzte Lackschichten
Letzte Lackschichten
Letzte Lackschichten
Letzte Lackschichten

7) Finale Schritte

Ich musste das Acryl noch zurechtschneiden. Eine Kreissäge war hier praktisch, da es schnell geht und diese sehr gerade schneiden kann, aber jedes andere Gerät tut den Job auch.

Acryl schneiden
Acryl schneiden

Es muss die Fenster überlagern, allerdings nicht zu breit sein um innen noch Platz zu haben…

Knapp
Knapp

Heisskleber, nicht schön, aber effektiv.

Kleben
Kleben
Mehr Kleber
Mehr Kleber

Erster Test-Look: yeah !

Fertig !
Fertig !

8) Impressionen

Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Blue LED in action
Blue LED in action

9) Credits

– Dank an Capcom für das Spiel 😉 *wiki-page*
– Cudos an Platinumfunghi für seine tollen Werke
– Thx an meinen Dad der mir immer bei den Arbeiten hilft
– Danke

fablablux
fablablux
und Rodolfo Baïz für die Lasercutting-Session (er hat wegen mir kaum was essen können, da der Foodtruck schon eingepackt hatte 😉 )

P.S: Alle Bilder haben ein Copyright, bitte mich kontaktieren bevor sie verwendet werden.

Avoid automatic restart for scheduled Windows 10 updates

The new update functions of Windows 10 are really annoying. No more “install updates on shutdown”, badly configurable update settings…

How to avoid an automatic restart of your PC after updates have been downloaded ? Force the settings like in a professional domain using group policies !

Start gpedit:

  • press WIN-Key
  • type gpedit.msc , hit enter
  • gpedit
  • Navigate to Computer settings -> Administrative templates -> Windows components -> Windows Updategpedit2
  • You will see that i already configured some options. Feel free to enable or disable them, a short description exists for every setting. Keep in mind that this may have unexpected results! You should know what you do. To revert, just change a setting back to “not configured”
  • Double-click on “No auto-restart with logged on users for scheduled automatic updates installations” and change it to ENABLED.
  • Breath again 🙂

 

The Mega Man 2 NES Casemod by Jigo.lu

Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo

It’s been years that I’ve thought of doing a Mega Man themed mod on one of my NES consoles and some time later Platinumfunghi released his brilliant Mega Man 2 mod. I was excited to see that someone did such a professional job, like he was reading my mind 😉
I decided to check off one thing on my virtual “to do list” and finally start my own Mega Man mod. I could have done a different Mega Man themed mod, but as part 2 was the best MM in my opinion (probably as I only owned that one as kid…), I couldn’t resist.
And before I forget: I was using a NTSC regionfree board for this console. I recently got a NTSC console,and the 60Hz are so much better for most of the NES games; the music/sound is calculated by the CPU and not on a separate soundchip,so even the music play faster 🙂

Enough blabla, let’s start:

1) Disassembling the donor

The donor case was a NES I got in big package. It had stickers on it and looked like it has been stored in a bunker for a long time…

1_web
Donor NES

We need to disassemble it completely as many parts will be painted alter on. Keep all the screws in a box or wherever you don’t lose them.

3_web
Screws..

4_web
Bottom

For reference, I also show the interior. It has common phillips screws too. Unscrew them, remove the top cover and unscrew any screws that are then visible.

Interior
Interior

Interior
Interior

We remove the switchboard too, as the powerbutton and resetbutton will be paint too, and additionally the LED is replaced with a blue one to match the Mega Man design.

Loose connectors
Loose connectors
Switchboard to be removed
Switchboard to be removed

Remove the buttons. You might use some force to pull them off.

Remove the buttons
Remove the buttons

The controller connectors hang loose and can just be pulled out of the case.

Controller connectors
Controller connectors

The top black parts can be removed by unscrewing 2 screws. The 3rd one holds the hatch in place.

Screws holding top black parts
Screws holding top black parts

Closeup,3 different fonts
Closeup,3 different fonts
P/R buttons
P/R buttons
"Black" Parts ;)
“Black” Parts 😉

As we now have everything put into pieces, it’s time to teach the board “more languages” 😉 Crimp the 4th pin of the CIC to make it eat NTSC and PAL games. Remember: the CPU of the board is responsible for the speed, not the game. PAL games will play faster on a NTSC console, NTSC games play at 50hz on a PAL console.

Not yet modified CIC. The 4th pin will soon gonna die
Not yet modified CIC.
The 4th pin will soon gonna die

2) Preparing the cover-part

For the top cover part, there are many solutions. I first wanted to print the Bossheads onto decal paper, then put those decals on acrylic glass.
Much easier solution: Print them on normal paper and use a laminating machine to make it durable. Together with the acrylic glass, we have a good looking, durable window 🙂

The graphic itself can be created using an emulator with the Mega Man 2 game, screenshooting the level selection. As the resolution is fairly low, use an image editing program, and resize it. Make sure to use the nearest neighbor resize option, as it will not retain the proper pixels with a bicubic resizer etc.

Real cutting
Real cutting
Finished background
Finished background

Let’s cut those windows out !

3) Cutting the cover

Cutting out the window is a very critical and difficult step. You could use a dremel or scissor-saw, but that would end in rough corners, non-parallel squares. I decided to cut them out by laser. As I don’t own a lasercutter, I was renting one in a Fablab in Luxembourg (Esch-Belval to be precise). I got some help by Rodolfo who knows how to set up the lasercutter.

Some things that you have to know: that plastic is melting fairly easy and it stinks like hell, don’t cut it in a bad ventilated area!

First steps
First steps
Lazerz !
Lazerz !
20c_web
Moar Lazerz !
Half through
Half through
One piece is not falling down ...
One piece is not falling down …
... because of the small part that is holding it in place
… because of the small part that is holding it in place
Diagonal view
Diagonal view

The last piece was cut out with a dremel (also available at the fablabs. Make sur to search for a fablab next to you! They grew out of an international educational program, and can be used by students, private persons and professionals, and therefore prices per hour vary).
Use sanding paper and a tool to finetune the edges.

Grinding tool
Grinding tool

Sandpaper
Sandpaper

4) Sprayjobs

I’m using the same water based mat colors as I usually do for my other console. I don’t like the shiny looks too much. I chose 2 different “Mega Man blue” colors and a “blanc cassé” white for the accent-stripe.

I started with some neutral beige primer. Let it dry for at least 15mins. The more time you give it, the better 😉

3 colors for this mod
3 colors for this mod

Primed
Primed

25_web
White stripes 😉
26_web
And the former black parts turned white too

I first painted the white accent stripe, then used painter’s tape to protect it from the next layers of blue paint. I used 3 thin layers of blue each time.

Bottom with lightblue
Bottom with lightblue
Cover taped with medium blue paint
Cover taped with medium blue paint
Cover taped with medium blue paint
Cover taped with medium blue paint

5) Replacing the LED by a blue one

Meanwhile, while waiting for the pieces to dry ( rest of the day and over night in my case), if was looking about how to change the LED. It’s fairly easy.

The Nintendo red LED is just an usual LED, bend over and soldered to the board.

LED closeup
LED closeup
LED closeup
LED closeup
Top view
Top view

It can be desoldered fairly easy. Heat it up and use a desoldering pump to suck away the old tin.

Desoldering pump
Desoldering pump

Use a tool to gently pull out the LED.

Extracting operation :)
Extracting operation 🙂

I more or less mesured the old LED and cut the new LED into the same size.

size of the original LED
size of the original LED

Then bend it a bit, not the whole 90°.

Bend new blue LED
Bend new blue LED

Make sure you insert it the RIGHT WAY ! It’s a diode and will only work one way 😉

Preinstalled...
Preinstalled…

Freshly soldered, we are good to go. The whole operation only takes 10 mins.

... and soldered !
… and soldered !

6) Decals !

A paint console looks cool, but only looks really good with some decals. I downloaded free fonts that look like the original Nintendo fonts and printed some decals. Delicate operation…

I directly printed lots of the same decals…they don’t take much space on the paper and you can easily fail while applying them!

Printouts
Printouts

Drop them into water,only after 2 layers of transparent spray / finisher. Let the finisher dry!

Leave them about 40s
Leave them about 40s

I used some tools to move the decals around easier. They can easily stick onto your fingers, so better use small metallic tools.

Tools that are helpful
Tools that are helpful

And that’s the result of a bad first try…didn’t I told you to print out some duplicates ?

First try..bad luck...
First try..bad luck…

45_web

I use a papertowel to suck away the water. Still be careful at this step, the decals can move on the waterdrops.

Careful while removing water
Careful while removing water

Couldn’t wait until it’s completely assembled, looked fine to me 🙂

Preinstalled
Preinstalled
Looks ok
Looks ok

I finished off the sprayjob and decals with some more layers with mat finisher. Was also the time to finish the green DMG Gameboy 😉

Finishing layers
Finishing layers
Finishing layers
Finishing layers
Finishing layers
Finishing layers
Finishing layers
Finishing layers

7) Final Steps

I still had to cut the acrylic glass. I used a sawing machine, but every other tool should be fine too.

Cutting the acrylic glass
Cutting the acrylic glass

It has to be larger than the windows, but not too large to not be able to fit in…

Close match
Close match

I just used some hot glue. Easy, fast,does the job neatly.

Glueing
Glueing
More glueing
More glueing

First test look: yeah !

And we're done !
And we’re done !

8) Impressions

Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Mega Man 2 NES by Jigo
Blue LED in action
Blue LED in action

9) Credits

– First of all, big thx go to Capcom for making the game 😉 *wiki-page*
– Cudos go to Platinumfunghi who’s creating amazing works and gives inspiration to the modding community
– More thx go to my dad who has more tools than me and assists me with cutting parts etc.
– Thx go to

fablablux
fablablux
and Rodolfo Baïz for the lasercutting session (he didn’t get much to eat for lunch as the foodtruck was already closing 😉 )

P.S: images are copyrighted, if you want to use them, contact me